10 Most Expensive Cities In The US

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America has the biggest economy in the world. It is home to some of the most expensive cities in the world. Most Americans agree that while the federal minimum wage is $7.25 an hour, it is not a livable wage. We are basing our top ten list on the survey done by 24/7 Wall St., a partner of USA TODAY, with the help of The Economic Policy Institute, a non-profit think tank. While the EPI calculated the income families need to secure a modest, yet adequate standard of living in counties and metro areas all over the United States. The 24/7 Wall St. reviewed the monthly living costs from EPI’s family budget survey in the costliest metro areas based on the Bureau of Economic Analysis’ regional price parities.
24/7 Wall St. identified the most expensive cities by first identifying 25 cities with the highest cost of living according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis as measured by regional price parities for metro. They matched each of these cities monthly living costs for a family of four and other costs of living data provided by the EPI.

  1. San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA

San Jose is the fourth largest California city by land area which is surrounded by rolling hills in Silicon Valley. It is a major technology hub in California’s Bay Area. Located in Santa Clara County, Sunnyvale is among the major cities comprising Silicon Valley. According to the BEA, the monthly cost of living there is 27.1% more expensive than the national average. For a family of four members, the monthly living cost is $10,758 and the monthly housing cost is $2,522. While the food cost of a four-member family is $896. 50.1% of adults at least have a bachelors degree in the city. And the poverty rate of the city is 9.4%.

2. Santa Cruz-Watsonville, CA

Located in Santa Cruz County, Watsonville city has a population of 54,098. The city’s economy is dominated by the farming industry. It is located on the central coast of California and is the second most expensive city in America. The city’s monthly cost of living is 24.8% more expensive than the national average. The monthly living cost of a family of four is $9,283 and their monthly housing cost is $1,764. The family spends $931 as their monthly food cost. 40.5% of adults of the city at least have a bachelor’s degree. The rate of poverty in the city is 13.7%.

3. San Francisco-Oakland-Hayward, CA

The San Francisco Metropolitan Area is the 3rd costliest area and the twelfth-most populated metropolitan area in the United States. The city has 48.5% adults with at least a bachelor’s degree. And it has a poverty rate of 9.2%. Their monthly cost of living is 24.7% more expensive than the national average, according to BEA. The living cost of a family of four is $12,370 and their monthly food cost is $998. They spend monthly $3,121 as their housing costs.

4. Urban Honolulu, HI

 

Honolulu is the largest city of Hawaii in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. It also holds the rank of being the fourth expensive city in America. The city’s poverty rate stands at 8.5%. 34.4% of the city’s adult at least have a bachelor’s degree. According to the BEA, the cost of living is 24.4% more expensive than the national average in this city. A four-member family’s monthly cost of living and monthly housing costs is $9,632 and $1,893 respectively. And the monthly food cost of a four-member family is $1,074.

5. New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA:

The New York metropolitan area is the largest metropolitan area by urban landmass in the world. According to the BEA, the New York metropolitan area’s cost of living is 22.0% more expensive than the national average. In this area adults with at least a bachelor’s degree is 39.0%. The city has a poverty rate of 13.5%. A family consisting of four members spends $10,344 as their monthly living cost and spends $1,789 as their Monthly housing costs. Monthly food will cost $908 for a family of four.

6. Napa, CA

Napa is the principal city of the Napa County Metropolitan Statistical Area and the largest city of Napa County. In California’s Wine Country, it is the second largest city. The cost of living in Napa is 21.9% more expensive than the national average. The monthly living costs of a family of four members are $8,565. A family consisting of four members spends $1,575 Monthly as their housing costs and spends $982 per month as their costs of food. 35.1% of adults at least have a bachelor’s degree in the city. The city has a poverty rate of 7.3%.

7. Santa Rosa, CA

Santa Rosa is located in Sonoma County, California. It is the sixth most populated city in the San Francisco Bay Area and the largest city in California’s Redwood Empire, Wine Country, and the North Bay. According to BEA, the cost of living in this city is 21.0% more expensive than the national average. A four member’s family’s Monthly living costs and Monthly housing costs $9,165 and $1,843 respectively. The costs of food are $913 for a four member’s family per month. The city has a poverty rate of 9.2%. Adults of the city with at least a bachelor’s degree are 33.9%.

8. Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT

Greater Bridgeport is a metropolitan area located in the state of Connecticut. The 8th most expensive city in the U.S. has a poverty rate of 8.6%. By the cost of living, the area is 20.1% more expensive than the national average. The monthly living costs of a family of four members are $8,387 and the monthly food costs are $883. The family spends $1,272 as their monthly housing cost. Adults with at least a bachelor’s degree in the city are 46.6%.

9. Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV

The Washington metropolitan area is the 9th most expensive city to live in and it is also the eighth-most-populous North American metropolitan area. According to BEA, the cost of living in this area is 19.1% more expensive than the national average. Monthly living cost of a family consisting of four members is $8,795 while the monthly housing costs and monthly food costs $1,693 and $858 respectively. The percentage of adults with at least a bachelor’s degree is 50.2%. The area has a poverty rate of 8.4%.

10. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA

The Los Angeles metropolitan area is the 3rd largest city by GDP in the world with a $1 trillion+ economy and the second-largest metropolitan area in the United States. This metropolitan city is 17.7% more expensive than the national average by the cost of living. The monthly living costs of a family of four members are $7,691 and the monthly housing costs and monthly food costs $1,663 and $830 respectively. The Los Angeles metropolitan area has the largest poverty rate among the top ten most expensive cities, which is 15.0%. The percentage of adults with at least a bachelor’s degree is 33.5%.

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