10 Highest Mountains In The World

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10 Highest Mountains In The World

Ever wonder how the earth would look like from the top of the highest mountain in the world, well if you do, you’re not the only one. Our home planet has a total of 109 mountains with elevations greater than 7,200 metres or 23,622 ft above sea level. All the top highest mountains belong to the Himalaya and Karakoram ranges. Measuring a mountain is not as the sea level is often problematic to define when a mountain is remote from the sea. Topographic Prominence is a popular method of distinguishing mountains from subsidiary peaks by their height above the highest saddle. Down below we’ve listed the 10 Highest Mountains In The World.

1. Mount Everest- (8,848m. or 29,029ft.):


Also known as Sagarmatha and Chomolungma, Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world as we all know. Everest was first ascended on 29 May 1953 by Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay. Everest is located on the border between the Northeastern part of Nepal and the autonomous region of Tibet. Mt Everest is named after the Land Surveyor General ’Sir George Everest’ who first tried to locate the exact position of the peak. Everest is part of the Seven Summits which is a list made up of the highest mountain on each of the world’s seven continents.

2. K2- (8,611m. or 28,251ft.):


K2, the second-highest mountain in the world, is also known as Chhogori and Godwin Austen. It is located on the border between China and Pakistan and a part of the Karakoram range. Mountainers prefer to start their climb from the Pakistan side as the Chinese side of the mountain is widely considered to be the more difficult and hazardous side. K2 is also known as the Savage Mountain because of the difficulties it presents for its climbers. It has the second-highest fatality rate of any mountain among the 14 mountains with a height over 8,000 metres. There are around 300 successful summits and 77 fatalities on K2. Approximately, one person dies on the mountain for every four who reach the summit. On, 31 July 1954 Italian climbers, Achille Compagnoni and Lino Lacedelli first ascended K2.

3. Kangchenjunga- (8,586 m. or 28,169ft.):

Located between Nepal and India, Kangchenjunga is the third highest mountain in the world and the second-highest mountain in the Himalayas. Kangchenjunga being blessed with five treasures of God, gold, silver, gems, grains and holy books, is also known as “The Five Treasures of Snows”. Joe Brown and George Band were first to climb Kangchenjunga on 25 May 1955. As promised to the Chogyal, the British climbers stopped short of the summit so the top of the mountain would remain intact. Every climber since has followed this tradition.

4. Lhotse- (8,516 m. or 27,940 ft.):


Lhotse the fourth highest mountain in the world with a height of 8,516 m, was first climbed by Fritz Luchsinger and Ernst Reiss on May 18, 1956. Part of the Everest massif on the border between Tibet of China and the Khumbu region of Nepal. Lhotse also includes the smaller peaks Lhotse Middle (East) at 8,414 m and Lhotse Shar at 8,383 m. Lhotse Middle is known as one of the toughest climb over eight thousand metres in the world. For a long time, the Middle remained the highest unclimbed in the world until May 23, 2001when it was first climbed by Eugeny Vinogradsky, Sergei Timofeev, Alexei Bolotov and Petr Kuznetsov.

5. Makalu- (8,485 m. or 27,838 ft.):


With a height of 8,485 m., Makalu is the fifth highest mountain on the earth located 19km southeast of Everest, on the border between Nepal and China. Makalu is an isolated peak whose shape is a four-sided pyramid and one of the eight-thousanders with a challenging climb. Makalu was first ascended on May 15, 1955, by Lionel Terray and Jean Couzy. Because of numerous pant-filling steep sections, sharp edges and steep pitches Makalu has the reputation of being one of the toughest climbs.

6. Cho Oyu- (8,188 m. or 26,864 ft.):


Cho Oyu with a height of 8,188 m is the sixth highest mountain in the world and also renowned for being one of the easiest mountains to climb. Cho Oyo, which means “Turquoise Goddess” stands on the China–Nepal border. Cho Oyu was first mounted on October 19, 1954, by Herbert Tichy, Joseph Jöchler and Pasang Dawa Lama.

7. Dhaulagiri I- (8,167m. or 26,795ft.):

Standing at 8,167 metres above sea level, Dhaulagiri is the seventh highest mountain in the world located in Nepal. It was first climbed on 13 May 1960 by Kurt Diemberger, A. Schelbert, E. Forrer, Nawang Dorje, Nyima Dorje, an effort combinedly done by a Swiss/Austrian/Nepali expedition. Dhaulagiri I is also the highest point of the Gandaki river basin and the Kali Gandaki River which flows between Annapurna I and Dhaulagiri I, is said to be the world’s deepest.

8. Manaslu- (8,163 m. or 26,781 ft.):


Standing in the Mansiri Himal, in the west-central part of Nepal, Manaslu is the eighth highest mountain in the world. ‘Manaslu’ which means “mountain of the spirit” was first climbed on May 9, 1956, by Toshio Imanishi and Gyalzen Norbu part of a Japanese team. Mountain Manaslu is surrounded by rock hard ice which covers a large area at the bottom of the mountain.

9. Nanga Parbat- (8,126 m. or 26,660 ft.):


The ninth highest mountain in the world, Nanga Parbat is located in the Diamer District of Pakistan’s Gilgit Baltistan region. It stands with a height of 8,126 m and it is the western anchor of the Himalayas. Offering one of the hardest climbs, Nanga Parbat is also “Killer Mountain” as numerous mountaineers died in the mid and early-20th century. On July 3, 1953, Nanga Parbat was ascended for the first time by Hermann Buhl. Nanga Parbat is also home to the Rupal Face, the highest mountain face in the world rising 4,600 m above its base.

10. Annapurna I- (8,091 m. or 26,545ft.):


Located in north-central Nepal, Annapurna I is a massif in the Himalayas and it includes many peaks, the highest one being over 8,000 metres. Annapurna I is the tenth highest mountain in the world and on 3 June 1950, Maurice Herzog and Louis Lachenal first climbed this mountain. Having a terrifying fatality rate, Annapurna and its supporting peaks in the massif are known as some of the most difficult and dangerous mountains to climb in the world. The fatality-to-summit ratio on Annapurna is 32%, the highest of any of the eight-thousanders.

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